Not Inappropriate. Just Ridiculous. But I Do Know What I’m Talking About.

I love red hair, pink drinks, and sugared rims. I am what I am.

I live in the very small and very strange world of social media. Well, it’s giant in the sense that everyone and their dog is on Facebook and Twitter, Google is commonly used as a verb, and YouTube gets over two billion video views a day. But factor in the fact that I use social media professionally for politics, and that pool shrinks down to a shallow puddle.

That’s right. I talk about politics on the internet for a living. I’m by no means the 1% in terms of income, but I make enough money to pay the kids’ tuition, buy an occasional pair of cute shoes, and enough boxed wine from BevMo to keep me happy. What else does a girl need?

I am the 1% of bloggers that get paid to do this. Take that for what you will, but I am incredibly thrilled to be able to have a job that I love instead of one that I tolerate in order to keep up with our lifestyle choices. We’ve chosen to make a life in Southern California, send our daughters to private school, to tithe to our church, drive an SUV, and occasionally go on a date to a fancy restaurant.

It’s a choice, it takes two incomes, and I am thrilled with my life.

This past weekend I was in San Francisco, having been invited to speak to the California Republican Party about the virtues of embracing social media like blogs, Facebook, and especially Twitter. I’ve spoken to many grassroots groups in the past about this topic, and I was looking forward to sharing my perspective in a seminar targeted to CA GOP County Chairs.

While at the convention, I happened to overhear a comment questioning the appropriateness of my presence on a panel at a GOP event. *

Wait … what? How is it inappropriate for me to speak to GOP leaders about how to use social media to connect with the voters? I’m usually speaking to the grassroots voters, and they are hungry for their leadership to have an online presence. How could I not be the perfect person to talk to the leadership about utilizing awesome tools to get voters connected to and invested in races to get out the vote?

This is what I do. I *get* social media. As evidenced by the fact that people pay me for my expertise on the matter. Do I know everything about everything? No. Do I even know everything about internet antics? No. But I have worked long and hard, and mostly through trial and error, have figured out a lot about what works online and what doesn’t.

It is a joy and a pleasure to share my thoughts about what I have learned with the public. My goal, with everything I do in my professional, political life, is to advance conservatism, so that everyone may have the opportunity to dream big and touch the stars.  When an opportunity to speak to GOP leadership about effectively using social media to get the vote out came up, I jumped at it. Votes are what win elections, and conservative voters vote for conservative candidates, who then create laws that don’t undermine the free market, and block the passage of those that do.

I am obviously not an inappropriate choice to speak to the California GOP leadership.

Sure, anyone that’s followed me online for even just a little bit knows that I have a tendency toward ridiculousness. I’m an odd duck in many regards. I hate calling people. I sneak into the Lincoln Memorial at 1am. I write posts about legs. I dye my hair red on a whim. Heck, I even write posts comparing my bikini-clad body to the national deficit.

I share these stories with you because they amuse me, and I hope they make you laugh a little. I also share my tales of struggle with parenting and marriage and hormones, because being a mom and a wife and a chick shapes who I am. I’m not into the whole ‘present an image to world of someone who’s not really me’ thing. What’s the point of that anyway? No one is perfect, so why pretend?

Above all, I want to share my life as an encouragement to others. I want people to know that politics is not a scary, unapproachable subject, and even someone as ridiculous as I am can get a firm grasp of what is going on in our country.

Take it or leave it, love me or hate me, but please don’t insult my job skills. I may be ridiculous at times, but attempting to undermine my knowledge in the field I have chosen as my profession just makes you look bad.

*This is why I would never ever wish for telepathic abilities. I’m perfectly content to live in ignorant bliss of how some people may feel about me.

Elsewhere on the Internet…

It’s Friday again, so maybe I’ll just officially move my weekly round-ups to Friday. Except then I probably wouldn’t get around to doing them until Saturday, and that just won’t suit.

So we’ll just call this Thursday and change, kind of like how I’m going to be 29 and change in a year instead of 30. Kapish? Excellent.

This Week at The Stir:

While I was at CPAC, the silly kids from the Occupy crowd tried to cause a ruckus. Jerks. Smelly, smelly jerks. How the media praises them and vilifies the Tea Party makes me ill.

I wrote about Media Matters and their leftest agenda. Which I totally don’t have a problem with, by the way. I do have a huge problem with their bias when they claim 501(c)(3) status as a nonprofit organization. By the way, Instapundit picked this one up. I’m just bragging. That’s all.

Did you hear about the little girl that had her unhealthy turkey sandwich confiscated by a government official? The school replaced her sack lunch with a hot meal from the cafeteria, of which the four-year-old ate three chicken nuggets. Yeah, so that happened.

President Obama wants to cut back our nukes by 80%. Now that’s just plain stupid.

This Week at Moms Matter:

I did a bad, bad thing in the eyes of the feminists. I failed to see how the legal right to end the life of my unborn child is more important than the economy, national security, education, job creation, energy exploration … should I go on?

This Week on Twitter:

Keith Olbermann blocked me, so that was exciting. I feel like I’m part of an exclusive club now. If someone tells me where the meetings are, I’ll bring the wine.

Elsewhere on the Internet

So. It’s been a little while since I’ve done one of these. Not sure if you could tell or not, but it’s been sort of a long summer three or so years. But good news! I’m getting my mojo back. Both kids are in school right now. I’m training for a half marathon. I get paychecks now (good for both the ego and the budget).

I’ve done dishes TWO nights this week.

Anyway. I wrote some stuff over the past week (or two … three?) that I’d love for you to click on. Maybe you could even read them! That would be awesome. Hopefully you’ll learn something, even if it’s just a different perspective.

A certain state is using taxpayer money to pay for babysitters for underprivileged kids. Except they’re not running background checks, so many of those sitters are rapists, child-molesters, drug dealers, etc. Which state it is? I’ll give you a clue: It starts with Ill and ends with nois.

In other skeezy news, ex-gangsta Cornell Jones took over $300,000 dollars of federal taxpayer dollars to build a strip club. How about we end some of this disgusting spending instead of raising revenue taxes?

Back in Illinois, it’s apparently illegal to record on-duty police officers. Where are we? Soviet Russia?

James Hoffa (not the one buried under a football field) of the Teamsters (not technically part of the mafia) opened up for President Obama at a pro-union rally on Labor Day. He told the president that the union workers were his army, and they were ready to take the Tea Party son of bitches out. The White House had no comment.

The lights went out in San Diego (and parts of Arizona and Mexico), which made me ponder what life would be like if we lost electricity suddenly and unexpectantly. As it turns out, EMPs are a real potential threat, and we’re going to need strong missile defense to combat them.

And finally, union thugs in Washington State went bananas on the port of Longview, destroying property and holding guards hostage. They were back at work the next day.

Happy reading!

PS- Thanks for putting up with me as I’ve been trying to navigate my new normal. Y’all are the best.

Motherhood and Political Activism Are Not Mutually Exclusive

Last Sunday, in honor of Mother’s Day, my friend Dana Loesch wrote a great piece on why she believes that motherhood is political. She says:

The nurture and protection of your children isn’t limited to monitoring their dietary needs, their educational needs, their emotional and spiritual well-being. I speak out because I don’t want my children saddled with debt. I don’t want my children’s generation to be the first generation that comes out of the gate with a lower standard of living because of our recklessness.

This pretty much echoes my thoughts on the matter. I feel like I owe it to my children to educate myself on Constitutional rights and limitations. I want others to love our country as much as I do and understand what makes it special. Like Dana, I want my kids to grow up in a phenomenal America, where if you can dream it, you can achieve it.

Working to protect the freedoms we enjoy in America flows seamlessly with our hopes and dreams for our children to be better off than we are. It makes perfect sense that moms are getting politically active, because we’re the ones with the most to lose: Our children’s future.

In response to Dana’s article, some chick piped up criticizing every mom in the country. Apparently, us mamas are not worthy to participate in politics because we choose to be a womb instead of study politics. Stay-at-home-moms are the absolute worst, because we’re lazy un-American do-nothings that leech off our partner’s salary.

Someone needs to call her mother and apologize.

This 23-year-old law school student has no idea what it means to be a mother. Our brains are not (completely) hijacked for 18 years when we give birth. We have every ability to read, listen, learn, write, and speak about any subject — including politics.

Motherhood and political activism are not mutually exclusive. It’s easier now than ever for moms to educate themselves and get involved with the conversation. Anyone with an Internet connection can find the Constitution online, download the text of laws like Obamacare, read the news, and find and share opinions on blogs.

Moms are awesome multitaskers. We take care of our kids, our husbands, and our homes. We learn new recipes, new technology (have you seen kids toys these days??), new stain-fighting tricks, and about the embalming techniques employed by the ancient Egyptians (that one might be just me).

We are smart enough to know that we can use sites like MomThink.org as a jumping off point in developing our political points-of-view. I love this site because of its straightforwardness on issues that will undoubtedly affect our children in the future. I love the encouragement to join Twitter or Facebook groups, where we can mingle with other moms over a virtual soda or glass of wine and share thoughts and even engage in friendly debate. I love that it makes me feel empowered, rather than inferior, to be a mom.

Motherhood is political. Anyone that’s ever navigated a playgroup or PTA meeting knows that.

It’s Time for the Federal Government to Stop Funding NPR

A few months ago, conservatives were outraged at the firing of liberalJuan Williams by National Public Radio for saying that flying with Islamic-looking males made him nervous on Fox News’ The O’Reily Factor. According to NPR’s head honcho Vivian Schiller, Mr. Williams had “several times in the past violated [their] news code of ethics with things that he had said on other people’s air.”

Apparently expressing an opinion based on the fact that virtually every airplane-hijacking terrorist in the United States over the past few decades has been a Jihadist is punishable by unemployment from NPR. Juan Williams did not state that he thought all Muslims were terrorists, or even that he refused to fly with them. He simply stated that it made him nervous.

Shortly thereafter, many prominent conservative pundits called for NPR to be defunded of the federal money that it receives. Private businesses can run things how they see fit, but organizations receiving taxpayer money should not be able to terminate someone’s employment for expressing a valid opinion, especially when it wasn’t even done on NPR’s airwaves.

In November, the then-Democratic House of Representatives defeated a bill to cut the federal fundingof NPR. The supposedly unbiased organization released this statement after the vote:

In an increasingly fractious media environment, public radio’s value in fostering an informed society has never been more critical. Our growing audience shows that we are meeting that need. It is imperative for federal funding to continue to ensure that this essential tool of democracy remains available to all Americans and thrives well into the future.

Fast forward to March 2011. Ron Schiller, a senior executive at NPR, was caught on tape in a sting operation criticizing the Republican party, and Tea Party Republicans in particular, as being racist, fundamentalist Christian, and fanatically involved in people’s personal lives.

**Side note: Democrats want to control our health care, our education, and what we can feed our kids, but Republicans are “fanatically involved in people’s personal lives”? Um, ok …

Read the rest at The Stir

Obama Budget Proposal Fails to Cut Spending

President Obama’s 2012 budget was released on Valentine’s Day, just in time to break conservative hearts everywhere. How many times do we have to say that we want less spending before he’ll listen to us? It’s more frustrating than trying to make a phone call using AT&T Wireless.

The President’s self-proclaimed ‘responsible’ budget will double the national debt from $13.56 trillion to $26.3 trillion by the end of 2021. Keep in mind that neither contractors nor the government ever comes in under budget.

President Obama claims that his budget reduces spending. Someone needs to tell him that two plus two does not equal three. It’s true that Obama’s budget reduces discretionary spending. It does this byredefining Pell grants (government- sponsored college scholarships for poor kids) and surface transportation spending as mandatory spending. The budget also reduces spending in Iraq and Afghanistan by $38.2 billion in 2012.

Obama’s 2012 budget increases spending, and it increases taxes on job creators. Probably not the best idea in an economic climate where Americans believe that unemployment is the number one issue to be tackled. Remember, a boss has to pay his taxes from somewhere. She might have to let an employee or two go to foot the bill.

Read the rest at The Stir

States Fight Back Over Obamacare

It’s official. People don’t like the new health care law. Half of the states are suing the Obama Administration to stop Obamacare. How many ways do we need to say it? Except for a few fringe leftists, nobody likes the bill that had to be made law before we could find out what was in it.

We decorated protest signs with magic markers, we went to rallies, we abandoned the mainstream media, we went to Washington, we elected a Republican in Massachusetts … We said, “No thank you,” to Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi and their bankrupting bill disguised as ‘health care reform.’

They rammed it down our throats anyway and told us we should be grateful. They insist that it reduces the deficit, and that repealing it would ‘cost’ taxpayers $230 billion over 10 years. I’m not sure how repealing a $940 billion spending bill adds to the debt, but then again, I’m still confused as to why I should pay someone else’s medical bills.

Read more at The Stir

Giffords, Guns, and Political Pandering

The vitriol spewed by many ‘news’ sources after the mass shooting in Tucson, Arizona, last Saturday has been pointless, political, and extremely uncalled for. A congresswoman was shot through the headand will probably never fully recover. Six people died, including a federal judge and a nine-year-old girl.

The Left came out swinging against their favorite target Sarah Palin, claiming that she has blood on her hands and that she caused the massacre. Apparently guns don’t kill people, metaphors do.

It wasn’t just Palin that the left accosted, but the Tea Party movementin general. Because, you know, Tea Partiers are so violent. That’s why there are always so many arrests at tea party rallies. (That was sarcasm, by the way. Tea Partiers may be crazy about Glenn Beck, but they’re not violent.)

Read the rest at The Stir

National Debt: Raise the Ceiling or Cut the Spending?

With the US Debt Clock continuing to tick, and the incoming freshman class in Congress saying they’ll vote against raising thedebt ceiling, it looks like Uncle Sam is going to have to go digging under the sofa cushions for loose change.

It turns out that money doesn’t grow on trees.

Margaret Thatcher once said, “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” We are officially out of money. Actually, we were out of money years ago, so we started borrowing it from China and future generations.

With all the wonderful government initiatives to pay for (wait — I thought health care was going to be free?), the money has to come from somewhere. It must be time for a tax increase. Maybe eliminating the mortgage interest deduction would help. What about a Value Added Tax? Of course, we could just let the Bush tax cuts expire in January.

Read more at The Stir

Jenny Erikson Radio Show – Episode 0003

In which I talk about the liberal litter bugs in DC, my favorite #WhyImVotingDemocrat tweets, and chat with Princella Smith about feminism, fetuses, and race.