Home From Boston

I’ve been home two days. It’s weird and dazy and strange and hard to believe that less than two week ago, my biggest worry was trying to figure out if I could make a bicoastal commute somehow work within the confines of my family.

Mitt was headed to the White House, yo. And I was going to be part of it.

There are a million reasons I could ponder on as to why we lost. Actually, there’s only one – we didn’t get enough votes. I know! By all accounts, it doesn’t make sense.

Now I could contemplate how we could be so wrong about our numbers and voter turnout, mention Obama’s superb ground game, or wonder why my generation seems more concerned with government-sponsored birth control than borrowing from our Children’s piggy banks, but that would be boring.

Instead I’ll just cliché it up: Nice guys finish last.

I don’t feel like the end of the world is here because Obama got reelected. I just feel like it’s going to be on hold for four more years. At best.

Oh, and I got a letter in the mail saying that my doctor no longer accepts my medical insurance. And my premiums went up about 30% last year. But Big Bird and binders!

Seriously guys, how did we lose this?

Double whammy for having worked for Romney: 1) He lost, and I’m out of a job, and 2) He lost, so companies aren’t hiring because they can’t afford to pay for everyone’s birth control and sex change operations.

I wasn’t there when my kids heard about Mommy’s Governor Romney’s loss, but I’m told that they said, “We may be poorer, but at least we have Jesus and our family.”

Love those goobers.

Meanwhile, I wrote about the 5 Stages of Election Loss Grief over at The Stir. I think I’m somewhere between incredulous and annoyed at the moment.

Short and Sweet: Obama vs. Romney on Medicare

Let’s be brief and straightforward on this, shall we? I’m getting a little bit sick of hearing the media whine about Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan wanting to rob Medicare, while praising Barack Obama for saving it even though he guts it of $716 billion.

Here’s the short of it: The Romney/Ryan plan puts citizens back in charge of their own health care, through a voucher system. The money goes from government-mandated spending on particular providers to a choice for the individual to spend that money where he or she wants.

Voucher systems work, because they put individuals back in charge of their own spending.

The Obama plan guts Medicare to pay for … wait for it … Obamacare, which is more government regulation. Because that works so well, you know. It’s not like our spending is out of control, there’s a doctor shortage, an education crisis, and of course the DMV is the epitome of efficiency.

But go ahead and keep complaining about Mitt Romney. I can’t wait to hear how Obama ends up shifting from blaming Bush to blaming Romney for his abysmal failure as a one-term president. I can hear it now … “That racist Mitt Romney stole my second term, when everything was going to be ok and everyone was going to get a puppy!”

Whatever. Go Mitt. Donate here. See you in November.

Susan the Liberal Lesbian

Meet Susan. She was at the Personal Democracy Forum (PDF) that I attended in New York City last week. I spied her out of the corner of my eye, glancing surreptitiously at my laptop as she paced back and forth a few times in front of me.

Let me note at this point that my laptop is decorated with a bumper sticker from the Media Research Center that boldly claims, “I don’t believe the liberal media.” Let me also note that PDF was attended largely by liberals. Since I’m noting things, let me also say that I got a lot of interesting looks, and a few conversations, for my computer decals.

With the gorgeous Ashley Sewell and the referenced laptop

Back to Susan, because my conversation with her was by far the best one I had over my bumper sticker. She finally made her way over to me, and very politely asked, “Excuse me if I’m being rude, but I can’t help but notice the sticker on your computer … Can I ask how you’d feel if I had a sticker on my computer that said, “I don’t believe the conservative media?”

I almost snickered and said, “What conservative media,” but I held my tongue. Instead, I told her I’d be fine with it. When she didn’t respond immediately, I continued, “I don’t think anyone should believe only one source of information.”

“What do you mean?” She asked, appearing genuinely dumbfounded.

“I think when you hear something, you should keep from forming an opinion on it until you have all the information. Just because someone says something doesn’t make it true, and you’re doing an injustice to the story and the people involved if you don’t try to gather as much information as possible before taking a stance on it. There’s always more than one side of the story.”

(I probably added that last bit in there because I’d seen Wicked the night before. Spectacular, by the way.)

“Wow,” Susan said, “That’s exactly how I feel.”

Doubt it. But whatever.

We chatted for a bit, and she told me that I was unlike most of her Republican friends. She said, I kid you not, “I have many friends that are Christians that think if you’re not a bible-thumping, gun-toting, straight person, you should be shot.”

My reaction was immediate and exclamatory, “Oh that’s horrible!”

“They have other qualities that I love dearly,” she rationalized.

“Well I’m a Bible-thumping, 2nd amendment supporting, conservative wife and mom, and I love my gay friends, and wouldn’t begin to question their sexual preferences.”

“I’m your typical middle-aged liberal lesbian in grad school…”

Now I can’t imagine having dear friends that I love that hated some of my life choices so much that they wanted to kill me, but to each their own. Or maybe those dear friends she’d mentioned previously were only composite friends, you know, kinda like Barack Obama’s college girlfriend.

It never ceases to amaze me how liberals view conservatives, and how they make crap up to defend their preconceived notions as to how we think. Susan, you seem like a lovely person, and I thank you for your curiosity and willingness to chat with me. Take another look at the Republican Party. We’re not the racist homophobes you think we are.

Mr. Machete Espouses Republican Ideals … Then Bashes Republicans

Enjoying Balboa Park with Thing 1

Last Saturday, my mom and I took the girls to Balboa Park in celebration of Mother’s Day. We started the day at the farmer’s market, gathering yummies for a picnic lunch, then we went to the Titanic exhibit (Thing 2 declared, “Uh-oh, that boat broked!”), and capped off the trip with a stroll through the park to enjoy the street performers.

I love street performers. As a general rule, I never give money to beggars (sometimes a sack lunch, but not money), but to performers that have worked hard to perfect a craft that they use to entertain and delight people? I’m all for supporting that.

One performer caught our eye, so we wandered over. Dude was juggling machetes. It was pretty cool. Even cooler was when he hopped on a giant unicycle and juggled the massive knives some more, albeit a bit more cautiously this time. S’ok, Mr. Machete, you can juggle those giant sharp things as carefully as you like while riding the six-foot unicycle. I won’t judge.

While he was entertaining the crowd, he mentioned that he would be passing around a hat, and it would be nice if people contributed.

Let me interrupt myself for a minute to tell you that earlier in the performance, he had made a derogatory George Bush joke. It was not well received. He said, “Wow, I knew San Diego was a pretty conservative town, but George Bush! Come on!” More silence, to which he said, “It’s like I’m in Utah,” and moved on.

So he’s up on the unicycle, telling the crowd that it had always been his dream to do this, and our contributions were what made him able to do this, and that in America, anyone can have a dream and work hard and achieve their goals. Total Republican stuff.

As he juggled, the hat was passed, and he asked us to contribute what we could. “If you’re a Republican, put twenty dollars in and prove to me that trickle down economics works!” I was half-tempted to do so, and then ask for a ten back, because as a Democrat (I assume, since he was bagging on Republicans), he should totally be in favor of wealth redistribution, and I needed that ten to give to the beggar down the block.

People need to pay more attention to party platforms. Republicans want you to be able to work hard and keep as much of your money as you can. Democrats like to redistribute your wealth to cowboy poets and postmenopausal yoga classes.

Thing 1 Just Says No to Dog Meat

I was reading this article from Mark Steyn about the exploding attack tactics being used by the Obama campaign against Mitt Romney. They tried to say that women wouldn’t like Romney because his great-grandfather was a polygamist, but somehow overlooked the fact that Barak Obama’s father was a polygamist.

Side note: Why liberals are down with gay marriage but not polygamy confuses the heck out of me. Isn’t that discrimination? Shouldn’t consenting adults be allowed to marry whomever they want to?

Another hypocritical criticism of Romney came when the Obama people decided to cry foul over the fact that the Romney family apparently strapped their crated dog to the roof of the car for a road trip in 1983. Then the fabulous Jim Treacher blogged on the Daily Caller that Obama had, as a child, eaten dog meat.

Better the roof of the car, then the roof of the mouth, Jim astutely pointed out.

The “Obama eats dog” meme has exploded on the Internets, because, well, it’s just so gosh darn hilarious to make fun of it. Dog recipes, anyone? Hall & Oates lyrics changed from Maneater to Dogeater? Brilliant.

Some people (I’m look at you, Leif!) don’t think the thing is funny. There are so many other issues to talk about — this is just stupid. The above linked article from Steyn does a good job laying out exactly why we should be laughing about it: It contrasts the comic value of the situation with the ridiculous seriousness that those on the left take themselves. We laugh; they form a Dogs Against Romney PAC.

He writes:

The exploding cigars are revealing not merely of Democratic hypocrisy but of a key difference in worldview between liberals and conservatives. Jeremy Funk and Governor Schweitzer reflexively believe that their dog-eating polygamy-scion is different from the other guy’s dog-transporting polygamy-scion. This is nothing to do with young Barack being six or ten years old and meekly eating whatever was put in front of him. He was 34 years old when he wrote the passage quoted above and ten years older when he recorded the audio edition. And, as both versions make plain, he thinks it’s kinda cool, and he knows that to the average upscale white liberal it has the electric frisson of the exotic other.

Earlier in the article, Steyn had mentioned dog breeder Kate McMillan, who said the following of the criticism that you can’t blame a child for eating what’s put in front of him:

Try this experiment–sit a normal, American 6 year old down at a plate and tell him it’s dog meat. Watch what happens.

With that inspiration, I grabbed my iphone and recorded this video of my eight-year-old daughter:

After establishing the fact that the girl is a regular carnivore, I asked if she would eat dog meat. She shakes her head and I ask her why that is.

“Because I would think of eating Junie’s* friends … and plus it sounds gross.”

*Furbaby’s real name is June. I guess that cat is out of the bag.

Top 7 for the Week of April 13

This week, Ashley and I talked about:

  1. Texas Christian School Fires Pregnant, Unmarried Woman
  2. Ann Romney, The Non-Working Mother
  3. Viva Las Vegas with the Hangover Mobile
  4. North Korea Suffers Rocketile Dysfunction
  5. Class Warfare and ‘Demeaning’ Jobs
  6. Made in America: Cutting-Edge Warship Built in Maine
  7. Taxes! And Then More Taxes.

Plus we have a song, a rant, a dirty joke, and an amazing Dude of the Week.

Happy listening!

Listen to internet radio with Top 7 on Blog Talk Radio

Politics in Action at the 2012 AAPC Pollie Awards

I was in Austin for a few days, attending the 2012 American Association of Political Consultants Pollie Awards and annual conference. Remember a few weeks ago when I went to San Francisco and pushed myself out of my comfort zone to talk with the California Republican Party (CRP) ‘establishment’?

Yeah, that was a walk in the park in terms of comfort zones compared to this shindig. This is the kind of event that honors James Carville. In fact, it’s the exact kind of event that honors James Carville, because the Ragin’ Cajun was inducted into the AAPC Hall of Fame, alongside Paul Begoda and Karl Rove. Eclectic group, huh?

At grassroots/activist events, the conference goers are all on fire for America, because … the Constitution! I love these people. They are my homeys. At the CRP thing in San Francisco, I mostly saw the same sort of the thing, just with titles like ‘GOP County Chair’ instead of ‘Beginner Blogger.’ I won’t pretend to equate that with all CRP things, and I especially can’t speak for GOP events in other states. I’m guessing the GOP varies greatly from California to Texas to New York to Vermont.

Republicans in Vermont. *snort*

Anyway. This was a whole new ballgame. These were … political consultants. What the heck do political consultants do? They help candidates win. Well, the good ones do, anyway.

It would be awesome if elections and campaigns were all about the message, the integrity of the candidate, and doing what’s best for our communities and country as a whole. The reality is, as my friend Brittany Cohan likes to say, is that politics is a game.

Only one thing wins elections – votes. Elections are number games. How many registered voters are in the constituency? How many voters intend to vote this cycle? How have they voted in the past? Can their vote be counted on? What’s it going to take to win the votes? It doesn’t matter if you’re the second coming yourself, if you don’t get the votes, you don’t win the election.

If politics is a game, and the candidate is the starting pitcher or the star quarterback, then the consultant is the coach. That’s a pretty loose analogy, especially given my (extremely) limited knowledge of sports, but it’s just something to give you a little bit of a picture of what happens in campaigns.

Maybe the candidate is the team owner … someone is going to have to help me out with my sports analogies…

The consultants analyze the numbers and come up with a strategy to win the votes. That’s why Karl Rove is always going on Fox News with his whiteboard and talking numbers. I’ve always understood that this is how it works, but it was cool to watch the really real professionals at work.

Because I was in Austin, Ashley Sewell drove in from Fort Worth. Because, duh, it’s Jenny and Ashley. Since Ms. Sewell and I were together in Texas, our favorite former Texas Railroad Commissioner and current congressional candidate Michael Williams met us for drinks. Since I was in Austin in the first place because Justin Hart brought me out to do some social media stuff and meet with some people, he joined up with us too. Then Justin’s CEO Ravi Singh stopped by to say hello, and he got to talking to Michael about his campaign.

Ravi’s company, ElectionMall, does this really cool Campaign Cloud thing. They got together with Microsoft to create this service that organizes campaign tools (social media, blast emails, donor lists, etc.), and makes them accessible through one login. They pretty much rule when it comes to managing campaign technology.

The conversation went something like this:

“Tell me about the race – what’s the seat?”

“U.S. Congress. District 33.”

“What’s the breakdown?”

“New seat. One of the four that Texas picked up in the census. The area voted for McCain in 2008.”

“How many candidates?”

“Eleven.”

“Ouch.”

“I know.”

“Ok, well how many votes do you need to win?”

Then they talked about some different strategies to get the vote out, how they could win over the independents, and how they could get sometimes voters to commit to going to the polls on Election Day. It was totally fascinating to watch, and a good reminder that if we want to win races and send conservative politicians to Washington, we have to play the game.

We need more than solid candidates. We need effective strategies and tools to gain supporters and get them to the polls on Election Day. That’s how we win.

Twitter Fun & Creepiness with #ILikeObamacare & #Gen44

On Friday, I had a lot of fun on Twitter with the #ILikeObamacare hashtag initiated by Team Obama to celebrate the second anniversary of the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare). As predicted, conservatives took over the thread, offering sarcastic reasons for why they liked Obamacare.

Here are some tweets that I sent out, just to give you a feeling for the game:

Because crappy care for all is better than excellent care for ANYONE willing to pay their bills. #ILikeObamacare

Because people w/ weight problems should have their care limited. Just like in Britain. #ILikeObamacare

#ILikeObamacare Because the DMV is AWESOME.

One of my favorite tweets I saw was from my friend Jon Gabriel, who said, #ILikeObamacare because a guy who can’t even protect a Twitter hashtag thread should be great at protecting my health.”

Then I got caught up in life getting ready for Thing 2’s birthday on Saturday, driving Thing 1 to and from a birthday party, and hosting an impromptu dinner party, because hey, why not?

Way too much fun was had at dinner Friday night, so I woke up with a fairly wicked hangover on Saturday morning. Whoops. All of my energy went into making Thing 2’s morning at the farmer’s market special, wrapping presents, and generally showering her with birthday love.

I finally hopped on Twitter yesterday evening to see what was going on, and I noticed a new hashtag flying by: #Gen44. So I asked my followers what the deal was, and they said it was the latest fail from Team Obama. I forced myself over to www.BarackObama.com, where I learned that Gen44 is the under-40 demographic.

So what’s the deal with the 44?

Barack Obama is the 44th President of the United States. I felt slightly nauseated. So I tweeted, “I threw up in my mouth a little upon discovering that Obama has named my generation after himself. #gen44

Seriously, you guys, this is not cool. This dude is so egotistical and out of touch with reality that it’s kinda scary. Obama wants us under-40s to volunteer our time, efforts, and cash to “ensure that President Obama and Democrats have the resources and infrastructure needed to implement the change we believe in.”

A movement shouldn’t be about a leader; it should focus on a cause. How do we know what President Obama really feels or wants for our country? He is always saying one thing and doing another. No one knows where he stands on anything. Why would an entire generation place their faith and trust in one man, and even refer to themselves by his moniker?

What does the president mean when he says we need to ensure that he has the resources needed to bring about change? What kind of change? What happened to compromise, and all that across-the-aisle stuff they’re always touting? Is Obama saying that Gen44 needs to rally together to obliterate the Republicans? That sounds a bit totalitarian, if you ask me.

I am not comfortable handing over resources to one person so that they can ‘change things’ and ‘take care of me.’ I’d rather my president step back, rein in the government from interfering with my life and finances, and trust me to make the best decisions for myself and my family.

I am not Gen44. I am Generation Independent.

Top 7 for the Week of March 16th

This week, Ashley and I talked about:

  1. It’s All that CO2 Making You Fat
  2. The Health Care War on Women (Hint – It’s not the Republicans depriving women of care)
  3. Gas Prices Are Up & the Cost of Living Skyrockets
  4. 50 Shades of Grey (Jenny talks about Twilight fan fiction mom-rotica, and Ashley asks, “What’s BDSM?”)
  5. Your Middle East Update
  6. The Obama Campaign’s 17-Minute Documentary
  7. Did Google+ Ruin Google?

Plus we have a rant, a Dude of the Week, and instead of a dirty joke, we have a pickle tasting party. Not a euphemism.

Happy listening!

Listen to internet radio with Top 7 on Blog Talk Radio

Elsewhere on the Internet…

It’s Friday again, so maybe I’ll just officially move my weekly round-ups to Friday. Except then I probably wouldn’t get around to doing them until Saturday, and that just won’t suit.

So we’ll just call this Thursday and change, kind of like how I’m going to be 29 and change in a year instead of 30. Kapish? Excellent.

This Week at The Stir:

While I was at CPAC, the silly kids from the Occupy crowd tried to cause a ruckus. Jerks. Smelly, smelly jerks. How the media praises them and vilifies the Tea Party makes me ill.

I wrote about Media Matters and their leftest agenda. Which I totally don’t have a problem with, by the way. I do have a huge problem with their bias when they claim 501(c)(3) status as a nonprofit organization. By the way, Instapundit picked this one up. I’m just bragging. That’s all.

Did you hear about the little girl that had her unhealthy turkey sandwich confiscated by a government official? The school replaced her sack lunch with a hot meal from the cafeteria, of which the four-year-old ate three chicken nuggets. Yeah, so that happened.

President Obama wants to cut back our nukes by 80%. Now that’s just plain stupid.

This Week at Moms Matter:

I did a bad, bad thing in the eyes of the feminists. I failed to see how the legal right to end the life of my unborn child is more important than the economy, national security, education, job creation, energy exploration … should I go on?

This Week on Twitter:

Keith Olbermann blocked me, so that was exciting. I feel like I’m part of an exclusive club now. If someone tells me where the meetings are, I’ll bring the wine.