Jenny Erikson Radio Show – Episode 0015

In which I chat about our splendiferous family vacation and how California politics almost marred it, and Ashley Sewell joins me to talk about Osama bin Laden’s death.

Mourning Osama bin Laden’s Death — Or At Least the Need for It

Nearly 10 years after masterminding the 9/11 attack on America, Osama bin Laden is dead. Not just dead, but killed by the United States Navy SEALs, sent in by President Obamahimself to bring back his body — dead or alive.

Let me take a moment to give credit where credit is due. President Bush began the hunt for Osama, but President Obama took hold of the torch he was handed, and by golly, he got the job done. Bravo, Mr. President.

Now comes the question as to how much joy we’re supposed to feel at the death of another human being. Soon after the pronouncement of Osama’s death, people were partying in the streets ofNew York and Washington, D.C. In my own neighborhood, I could hear my neighbors whooping it up.

As the news scrolled across our own TV screen, our 7-year-old daughter asked, “Who’s Osama?”

“He was a very bad man that killed a lot of people,” I told her as simply as I could. She responded thoughtfully, “Oh. Then I’m glad he’s dead. He won’t be killing anyone now.”

Read the rest at The Stir

Kill Him Dead.

Someone needs to explain this to me. A lawyer perhaps. Maybe a cop. Because I do. Not. Understand.

John Albert Gardner III forcefully raped and brutally murdered two beautiful teenage girls. He watched as the life drained from their terrified eyes, and hid their abused bodies in shallow graves. He took their lives and destroyed those of their family and friends. He shook the trust of a community. MY community.

He’s flat out admitted that he killed them. He raped them both. He stabbed Amber. He strangled Chelsea. He got rid of their bodies. Didn’t manage to get rid of Chelsea’s DNA though. And through a plea bargain, he led the police to Amber’s body.

The plea bargain basically said that he would avoid the death penalty if he pled guilty and revealed the location on Amber’s body.

He will now serve three life sentences, two of them without parole (The third is for an attempted attack on another woman that managed to escape). Chelsea’s parents agreed to the conditions because they knew the Dubois family needed closure, and the death penalty is an empty promise in California anyway.

Why is it an empty promise?

Why can’t we kill these demented perverts?

Why do they have more rights under the law than their victims did?

Why can’t the cops and lawyers make a plea bargain stating, “If you plead guilty and give up the location of Amber’s body, you can have a painless injection. If you don’t, we’ll fry you. Or hang you. Or chop parts of you off and let you bleed to death. Your choice.”

That’s a plea bargain I can get behind.

Life without parole isn’t good enough.

James Moore was spared the death penalty in 1962 after raping and murdering a 14 year old girl. Thanks to a change in the law, he’s now eligible for parole every two years.

In 1966, Kenneth McDuff killed a couple of teenage boys, then raped and killed one of those boy’s girlfriend. He got a life sentence. And was let out in 1989 when prisons were overflowing. He went on to rape and kill at least nine other women. We’ll never really know how many.

Willie Horton.

Clarence Ray Allen.

And many, many more.

Life without parole doesn’t cut it. Kill him.

Kill him dead.

And that’s how I feel about that.